Got Demons?

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The Demon Kumbhakarna is Defeated by Rama and Lakshmana. ca 1670. Metropolitan Museum of Art (public domain)
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The Role of Sadness in “Inside Out”

Unsurprisingly very nice piece by Dachel Keltner and Paul Ekman in the New York Times on the portrayal of emotions in the recent Pixar movie “Inside Out.”

…studies find that sadness is associated with elevated physiological arousal, activating the body to respond to loss. And in the film, Sadness is frumpy and off-putting. More often in real life, one person’s sadness pulls other people in to comfort and help.

First, emotions organize — rather than disrupt — rational thinking. Traditionally, in the history of Western thought, the prevailing view has been that emotions are enemies of rationality and disruptive of cooperative social relations.

Also posted at LA Eastsider Depressed

The Depression Blog*

KONICA MINOLTA DIGITAL CAMERA photo by nevil zavery (creative commons) I’ve got another blog kicking around. Though it’s called LA Eastsider Depressed it’s devoted to a number of topics, much like this blog. The style is a little less wordy than here, and I’m making more of an effort toward variety — quotes, images, videos, poetry, etc. Some of the recent posts:

*LA Eastsider Depressed has been renamed! It’s now Los Feliz Psychologist, but there will still be plenty of stuff about depression. All the old links will work, too.

New Blogs and a Web Page

Since I’ve moved my practice to the Los Feliz neighborhood, about a year ago, I’ve started two new blogs. One covers mental health in general, Los Feliz Psychologist, and the other, LA Eastsider Mindful, focusses on mindfulness. The mindfulness topic was taking up lots of bandwidth on this blog, so I gave it its own forum.

There’s a map on the sidebar to the right, to help you locate my new office. Find a brief bio and some thoughts about psychotherapy at kaleachapman.wordpress.com I hope you’ll stop by!

Free Ebook — Psychotherapy FAQ

For some time now I’ve hosted a page with a compilation of thoughts on “What is Psychotherapy?” I’ve now combined and lightly edited these posts, and bundled them together into a free ebook, Psychotherapy: Frequently Asked Questions. The book is divided into two parts.

Part I focuses on the many questions —  frequently relating to doubts, fears, and misconceptions – that people have about psychotherapy.

Part II digs in a little more – focusing more on the nature of therapy and what one might expect from treatment. You can click here for the page.

Or click here psychotherapy faq to download the ebook.

 

Understanding Bipolar Disorder, Visual Edition

Recently came across, and enjoyed, this graphic novel that chronicles one woman’s struggle with bipolar disorder. I’m not going to review it here, but I will say that I enjoyed it. It accurately describes the frustrations that those with bipolar face to find the right balance of treatments. As the NPR reviewer wrote:

Bipolar disorder defies easy treatment; each individual patient must become their own guinea pig to discover the balance of medication and lifestyle therapies that will allow him or her to achieve long-term stability.

Here are a few reviews, including the one from NPR:

From Manic Highs to Oceanic Lows, (NPR)

Marbles: Mania, Depression, Michelangelo & Me, (The Guardian)

Marbles, By Ellen Forney, and More, (The New York Times)

Reprise on Torture – Why Ken Pope Resigned from APA – in 2009

The issue of torture by our government, and the role of psychologists in that policy, has been a concern of some psychologists since as early as 2009. Obviously it’s gotten more airtime since the recent senate report. Some of you may find the thoughts of one prominent psychologist — known for his ethics textbook, among other things — of interest.

Here’s the link to that earlier post.